The 2030 Agenda

Time to Deliver

"The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets which we are announcing today demonstrate the scale and ambition of this new universal Agenda. They seek to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve."

The 2030 Agenda

 

The breadth and ambition of the 2030 Agenda poses a significant implementation challenge. At current rates of progress, none of the selected SDG targets below will be met by 2030.

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Selected target:

1.1  
End extreme poverty
2.1  
End hunger
3.1 
 Reduce maternal mortality
4.1 
Universal secondary education
5.3 
End child marriage

 

6.2 
 Universal access to sanitation

2030 projection:

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7.1   

Universal access to energy

8.1  
Economic growth in LDCs

9.2  Industrialisation in LDCs

10.1  Reduce income inequality

11.1

 Reduce slum populations

12.5  

Reduce waste

 

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13.2  Combat climate change

14.2  
Protect marine environments

15.2  
Halt deforestation
16.2  
Reduce violent deaths

17.1  Mobilise domestic resources

 

 

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"This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It also seeks to strengthen universal peace."

 Turning Ambition Into Reality — Platforms and Partnerships for Delivering Agenda 2030

“The new agenda was developed through an extensive process of debate and consultation, but relatively little attention has been paid to how countries can achieve the acceleration in social, economic, and environmental progress that will be needed if the goals are to be delivered in full. This paper explores the role global platforms and partnerships can play in bringing governments, the private sector, civil society, and international organizations together around shared strategies for implementation of one or more of the SDGs. ”

Written by David Steven and Eric Kashambuzi, published by NYU's Center on International Cooperation in July 2016.

 What happens now? Time to deliver the post-2015 development agenda

“Will this much more ambitious set of goals and targets really drive delivery? Does the new agenda create a narrative that will resonate beyond the UN's negotiating rooms? What role will be played by poor, middle income, and rich countries? And given that this year will also see a major climate summit, will the world enter 2016 more or less able to tackle shared challenges?”

The third in David Steven's series of updates, co-written with Alex Evans, on the 2030 Agenda negotiations, published in April 2015.

From Declaration to Delivery, Actioning the Post-2015 Agenda

 

 

 

 

“At the SDG Summit in September, leaders must not only announce the new goals, but make concrete and convincing commitments for how they will deliver them at national and international levels.”

 

We developed this synthesis report on a series of national dialogues on implementation of the SDGs, supported by Save the Children, in June 2015.

 

 

The Post-2015 Agenda — Delivering its Core Promises to Children

 

 

 

“There is currently no holistic vision for delivering to children the core promises of Agenda 2030 to children, with strategies being built on a sector-by-sector basis. This is likely to have the greatest detrimental impact on the most vulnerable children in all countries, especially those living in conflict-affected or fragile states. It is time to make Agenda 2030 compelling by developing credible plans for financing and delivering the most urgent priorities for children, using the core promises to clarify the mission and increase accountability for delivering it.”

 

NYU's Center on International Cooperation published this report by David Steven in May 2015.